Endangered Species Act Marks Fortieth Anniversary

Joe Roman discusses the landmark legislation with Heather Goldstone on WCAI.

From the category archives:

News

At the end of the last ice age, about 12,000 years ago, there were at least 48 types of very large, plant-eating animals. Of those 48, just nine remain. None of them live in North or South America. Read more about the impacts of extinction in Student Science.

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Baleen whales are some of the largest creatures on Earth, but they feed on some of the smallest – tiny ocean-dwelling crustaceans called krill and copepods. Listen to Annabel Beichman and Jon Sanders discuss our research on Microbe Post.

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Rebeca Ibarra reports on our work on how animals move phosphorous around the planet in the New York Daily News.

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Whales fertilize ocean surface waters with key nutrients like phosphorus, which move through the food chain, and eventually, onto land. Christopher Intagliata interviews Joe Roman on Scientific American‘s 60-Second Science.

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Rachel Feldman reports on our recent work in The Washington Post: “A world bereft of large wild animals, whether they are whales, salmon, albatrosses, or elephants, is a less productive place — and one that has lost much of its magic,” Roman said. “We can turn these effects around by restoring native populations of large vertebrates around the globe.”

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The planet has suffered twofold from the removal of large animal biomass. Not only from the lack of diversity created by the extinctions of ancient megafauna and modern, human-induced depletions of many species – from seabirds to elephants, and whales – but from what they once did for our planet by spreading their poo around, redistributing nutrients and fertilizing new growth. Read Philip Hoare’s take on our work in The Guardian

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Jesse Greenspan reports on two foreign bird species listed as endangered under the ESA in October 2015. Today the act protects about 654 foreign species in addition to more than 1,500 U.S. ones. Read more in Audubon.

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Rebecca Flynn reports on the highlights of the Ecological Society of America, including our work on whale carcasses and migration. Read more at oceanbites.

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Richard Conniff reports on our research on lifting baselines–and lifts a glass to the return of endangered species. Read more at TakePart.

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Brian Switek reflects on the whale pump and marine reptile poop on National Geographic.

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